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  Artist Title Label Price

Solar Race

Format: Vinyl 12 Inch
Genre: Punk

Solar Race EP

A1 Get Ahead (4:21)
A2 Good Enough (3:25)
AA1 Juvinile (2:21)
AA2 Drink My Piss (4:40)

Silvertone Records

Cat No: ORE T 79
Released: 1996

£5.00

Kim Wilde

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

Select

A1 Ego
A2 Words Fell Down
A3 Action City
A4 View From A Bridge
A5 Just A Feeling
B1 Chaos At The Airport
B2 Take Me Tonight
B3 Can You Come Over
B4 Wendy Sadd
B5 Cambodia - Reprise

RAK

Cat No: SRAK 548
Released: 1982

£5.00

Shriekback

Format: Vinyl 12 Inch
Genre: Punk

Hand On My Heart

A Hand On My Heart (5:54)
B1 Suck (5:38)
B2 Nerve (2:47)

Arista

Cat No: shrk 121
Released: 1984

£5.00

New Model Army

Format: Vinyl 12 Inch
Genre: Punk

Better Than Them (The Acoustic E.P.)

A1 Better Than Them (3:09)
A2 No Sense (2:40)
B1 Adrenalin (3:47)
B2 Trust (2:26)

EMI

Cat No: 12 NMA 2
Released: 1985
Out Of Stock

The Stranglers

Format: Vinyl 12 Inch
Genre: Punk

Grip '89 (Get A) Grip (On Yourself)

A1 Grip '89 (Grippin' Stuff Mix)
A2 Grip '89 (Get A) Grip (On Yourself) (Single Mix)
B1 Waltzinblack
B2 Tomorrow Was The Hereafter

EMI

Cat No: 12 EM 84
Released: 1989

£5.00

Sex Pistols

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

Some Product - Carri On Sex Pistols

A1 The Very Name 'Sex Pistols' (5:29)
A2 From Beyond The Grave (8:08)
A3 Big Tits Across America (11:27)
B1 The Complex World Of Johnny Rotten (8:16)
B2 Sex Pistols Will Play (3:21)
B3 Is The Queen A Moron? (3:52)
B4 The Fucking Rotter (1:12)

Virgin

Cat No: VR2
Released: 1979
Out Of Stock

Various

Format: Vinyl Compilation
Genre: Punk

We Do 'Em Our Way

A1 Sex Pistols (We're Gonna) Rock Around The Clock
A2 Devo Satisfaction (I Can't Get Me No)
A3 The Golant Pistons Friday On My Mind
A4 Sex Pistols (I'm Not Your) Stepping Stone
A5 Those Helicopters World Without Love
A6 Hollywood Brats Then He Kissed Me
B1 The Flying Lizards Money
B2 The Slits I Heard It Through The Grapevine
B3 The Stranglers Walk On By
B4 The Gorillas You Really Got Me
B5 UK Subs She's Not There
B6 The Dickies Nights In White Satin

Music For Pleasure

Cat No: MFP 50481
Released: 1980
Out Of Stock

X-Ray Spex

Format: Vinyl 7 Inch
Genre: Punk

The Day The World Turned Day-glo

A The Day The World Turned Dayglo
B Iama Poseur

EMI International

Cat No: INT 553
Released: 1978

£3.00

UK Subs

Format: Vinyl 7 Inch
Genre: Punk

Warhead

A Warhead (3:02)
B1 The Harper (1:08)
B2 I'm Waiting For The Man (2:24)

GEM

Cat No: GEMS 23
Released: 1980

£9.00

Public Image Limited

Format: Vinyl 7 Inch
Genre: Punk

Public Image

A Public Image (2:58)
B The Cowboy Song (2:17)

Virgin

Cat No: VS 228
Released: 1978

£5.00

The Bollock Brothers

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

The 4 Horsemen Of The Apocalypse

A1 Legend Of The Snake
A2 Mistress Of The Macabre
A3 Woke Up This Morning Found Myself Dead
A4 Faith Healer
B1 King Rat
B2 The Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse
B3 Loud, Loud, Loud
B4 The Seventh Seal

Charly Records

Cat No: BOLL 103
Released: 1985
Out Of Stock

Assorted Jelly Beans

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

WWW.Y2KTheory.EP..A.J.B..Com

A1 Www.Deadnabore.A.J.B.Com
A2 Www.11.Booshduck*Do*Dis.A.J.B.Com
A3 Www.Oddworld.Hola.C*Ga*May.A.J.B.Com
B1 Www.I'Minthemixmix.A.J.B.Com
B2 Www.Mixeddznutz.A.J.B.Com

Kung Fu Records

Cat No: 78770-1
Released: 1999

£11.00

Joe King Carrasco & The Crowns

Format: Vinyl 12 Inch
Genre: Punk

Party Safari

A1 Bad Rap (3:54)
A2 Gin Baby Gin (3:31)
B1 That's The Love (2:52)
B2 Ta U La Ou Va (4:25)

Hannibal Records

Cat No: HNEP-3301
Released: 1981

£5.00

Toyah

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

Toyah! Toyah! Toyah!

A1 Victims Of The Riddle (3:30)
A2 Indecision (2:35)
A3 Love Me (3:00)
A4 Visions (4:15)
A5 Tribal Look (3:30)
A6 Bird In Flight (4:00)
B1 Danced (5:30)
B2 Insects (2:45)
B3 Race Through Space (3:06)
B4 Ieya (8:30)

Safari Records

Cat No: LIVE 2
Released: 1980

£4.00

Magazine

Format: Vinyl Album
Genre: Punk

Secondhand Daylight

A1 Feed The Enemy (5:45)
A2 Rhythm Of Cruelty (3:03)
A3 Cut-Out Shapes (4:43)
A4 Talk To The Body (3:34)
A5 I Wanted Your Heart (5:13)
B1 The Thin Air (4:10)
B2 Back To Nature (6:40)
B3 Believe That I Understand (4:00)
B4 Permafrost (5:25)

Virgin

Cat No: V 2121
Released: 1979
Out Of Stock
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Information on the Punk genre

Punk rock is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed the perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. They created fast, hard-edged music, typically with short songs, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY (do it yourself) ethic, with many bands self-producing their recordings and distributing them through informal channels.

By late 1976, bands such as the Ramones, in New York City, and the Sex Pistols and The Clash, in London, were recognized as the vanguard of a new musical movement. The following year saw punk rock spreading around the world. Punk quickly, though briefly, became a major cultural phenomenon in the United Kingdom. For the most part, punk took root in local scenes that tended to reject association with the mainstream. An associated punk subculture emerged, expressing youthful rebellion and characterized by distinctive styles of clothing and adornment and a variety of anti-authoritarian ideologies.

By the beginning of the 1980s, faster, more aggressive styles such as hardcore and Oi! had become the predominant mode of punk rock. Musicians identifying with or inspired by punk also pursued a broad range of other variations, giving rise to post-punk and the alternative rock movement. By the turn of the century, pop punk had been adopted by the mainstream, with bands such as Green Day and The Offspring bringing the genre widespread popularity.


The first wave of punk rock aimed to be aggressively modern, distancing itself from the bombast and sentimentality of early 1970s rock. According to Ramones drummer Tommy Ramone, "In its initial form, a lot of [1960s] stuff was innovative and exciting. Unfortunately, what happens is that people who could not hold a candle to the likes of Hendrix started noodling away. Soon you had endless solos that went nowhere. By 1973, I knew that what was needed was some pure, stripped down, no bullshit rock 'n' roll." John Holmstrom, founding editor of Punk magazine, recalls feeling "punk rock had to come along because the rock scene had become so tame that like Billy Joel and Simon and Garfunkel were being called rock and roll, when to me and other fans, rock and roll meant this wild and rebellious music." In critic Robert Christgau's description, "It was also a subculture that scornfully rejected the political idealism and Californian flower-power silliness of hippie myth."[5] Patti Smith, in contrast, suggests in the documentary 25 Years of Punk that the hippies and the punk rockers were linked by a common anti-establishment mentality.

Throughout punk rock history, technical accessibility and a DIY spirit have been prized. In the early days of punk rock, this ethic stood in marked contrast to what those in the scene regarded as the ostentatious musical effects and technological demands of many mainstream rock bands. Musical virtuosity was often looked on with suspicion. According to Holmstrom, punk rock was "rock and roll by people who didn't have very much skills as musicians but still felt the need to express themselves through music". In December 1976, the English fanzine Sideburns published a now-famous illustration of three chords, captioned "This is a chord, this is another, this is a third. Now form a band." The title of a 1980 single by New York punk band The Stimulators, "Loud Fast Rules!", inscribed a catchphrase for punk's basic musical approach.

Some of British punk rock's leading figures made a show of rejecting not only contemporary mainstream rock and the broader culture it was associated with, but their own most celebrated predecessors: "No Elvis, Beatles or the Rolling Stones in 1977", declared The Clash song "1977". The previous year, when the punk rock revolution began in Great Britain, was to be both a musical and a cultural "Year Zero". Even as nostalgia was discarded, many in the scene adopted a nihilistic attitude summed up by the Sex Pistols slogan "No Future"; in the later words of one observer, amid the unemployment and social unrest in 1977, "punk's nihilistic swagger was the most thrilling thing in England." While "self-imposed alienation" was common among "drunk punks" and "gutter punks", there was always a tension between their nihilistic outlook and the "radical leftist utopianism" of bands such as Crass, who found positive, liberating meaning in the movement. As a Clash associate describes singer Joe Strummer's outlook, "Punk rock is meant to be our freedom. We're meant to be able to do what we want to do."

The issue of authenticity is important in the punk subculture—the pejorative term "poseur" is applied to those who associate with punk and adopt its stylistic attributes but are deemed not to share or understand the underlying values and philosophy. Scholar Daniel S. Traber argues that "attaining authenticity in the punk identity can be difficult"; as the punk scene matured, he observes, eventually "everyone got called a poseur".